Earth Belongs to all species

Loss in aquatic ecosystem, related biodiversity and depletion of ground water resources.

Project Tapovana - Eco-restoration of grassy blanks in Talacauvery wildlife Sanctuary.

A Model Forest is both a geographic area and an approach to the sustainable management of landscapes and natural resources. Geographically, a Model Forest must encompass a landbase large enough to represent all of the forest's uses and values. They are a fully working landscape of forests, farms, protected areas, rivers and towns. The approach is based on flexible landscape and ecosystem management that combines the social, environmental and economic needs of local communities with the long-term sustainability of large landscapes. The approach links a comprehensive mix of stakeholders, natural resource users and land use sectors within a given landscape and helps create a common vision of sustainability and constructive dialogue involving all stakeholders. Those involved define what sustainability means in their own context, identify a common vision and set of goals, devise a governance structure and strategic plan, then work collaboratively to achieve the goals set out in that plan. In turn, the process nurtures a depth of trust and transparency and increases the willingness to implement innovative solutions.

Mapping, Quantitative Assessment and Geographic Distribution and Population Status of Plant Resources of Western Ghats.

There is no standard template for developing a Model Forest. The creativity of the stakeholders involved, as well as regional, cultural and other circumstances, will all influence the form and function of the Model Forest that is ultimately developed. While most processes have been led by a national government agency, in some areas a different stakeholder has taken a leadership role in developing a Model Forest. On average, establishing a functioning Model Forest takes approximately two years. Once a decision is made to proceed with developing a Model Forest, a letter of intent must be sent to the IMFN Secretariat or, where there is a formal regional network, via the regional Model Forest office, stating your group’s intentions. The letter of intent is the basis on which the IMFN Secretariat and regional network will work with the stakeholders to develop a Model Forest. In general, there are six basic steps that are typically followed in developing a Model Forest: 1) becoming familiar with the approach, 2) selecting an area, 3) identifying an initial stakeholder group, 4) holding workshops to discuss Model Forest development, 5) preparing a Model Forest strategic plan, 6) submitting an application and undergoing a site assessment. Depending on how much technical support is available in a region, the roles and responsibilities involved in setting up the Model Forest and in reviewing applications for membership in the IMFN will be shared between the IMFN Secretariat and a regional and/or national Model Forest network office. For more information, please go to our Model Forest Development Guide.

Acquisition of rights in Jamma Malais.

The Model Forest does not exercise decision-making or management authority over the territory or natural resources. All such authorities and management responsibilities remain with existing tenure holders, land owners, and land and resource managers. However, the Model Forest influences resource use in three main ways: Because the Model Forest stakeholder group includes all key resource users (government, industry, private owners, and others, for example), they are participants in defining the Model Forest, its goals, and its administration. The Model Forest undertakes projects, research, and other activities on the landbase in collaboration and agreement with the major tenure holders. Therefore, the tenure holders are significant beneficiaries of Model Forest work. The Model Forest's activity is relevant at a national policy level. Its activities and experiments point the way to applications in sustainable management within and beyond the Model Forest borders. Its influence can be considered then as being indirect, and long-term.

Fire Protection of the natural forests

The Model Forest does not exercise decision-making or management authority over the territory or natural resources. All such authorities and management responsibilities remain with existing tenure holders, land owners, and land and resource managers. However, the Model Forest influences resource use in three main ways: Because the Model Forest stakeholder group includes all key resource users (government, industry, private owners, and others, for example), they are participants in defining the Model Forest, its goals, and its administration. The Model Forest undertakes projects, research, and other activities on the landbase in collaboration and agreement with the major tenure holders. Therefore, the tenure holders are significant beneficiaries of Model Forest work. The Model Forest's activity is relevant at a national policy level. Its activities and experiments point the way to applications in sustainable management within and beyond the Model Forest borders. Its influence can be considered then as being indirect, and long-term.

Afforestation and enrichment of degraded forest

The Model Forest does not exercise decision-making or management authority over the territory or natural resources. All such authorities and management responsibilities remain with existing tenure holders, land owners, and land and resource managers. However, the Model Forest influences resource use in three main ways: Because the Model Forest stakeholder group includes all key resource users (government, industry, private owners, and others, for example), they are participants in defining the Model Forest, its goals, and its administration. The Model Forest undertakes projects, research, and other activities on the landbase in collaboration and agreement with the major tenure holders. Therefore, the tenure holders are significant beneficiaries of Model Forest work. The Model Forest's activity is relevant at a national policy level. Its activities and experiments point the way to applications in sustainable management within and beyond the Model Forest borders. Its influence can be considered then as being indirect, and long-term.

Formation of Ecological Territorial Army Battalions for Forest Conservation.

The Model Forest does not exercise decision-making or management authority over the territory or natural resources. All such authorities and management responsibilities remain with existing tenure holders, land owners, and land and resource managers. However, the Model Forest influences resource use in three main ways: Because the Model Forest stakeholder group includes all key resource users (government, industry, private owners, and others, for example), they are participants in defining the Model Forest, its goals, and its administration. The Model Forest undertakes projects, research, and other activities on the landbase in collaboration and agreement with the major tenure holders. Therefore, the tenure holders are significant beneficiaries of Model Forest work. The Model Forest's activity is relevant at a national policy level. Its activities and experiments point the way to applications in sustainable management within and beyond the Model Forest borders. Its influence can be considered then as being indirect, and long-term.

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